New Brazil President Bolsonaro takes aim at crime, corruption

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Bolsonaro was sworn in as at president on Tuesday, promising to overhaul the country's economy and bring about sweeping social change.

They were surrounded by dozens of guards on horses and plain-clothes bodyguards who ran beside the auto.

Supporters of the Brazilian President-elect Jair Bolsonaro, gather next to the Metropolitan Cathedral in Brasilia, on December 31, 2018, on the eve of his inauguration ceremony. Bolsonaro then read a short speech that included numerous far-right positions he staked out during the campaign.


"Congratulations to President @jairbolsonaro who just made a great inauguration speech", the U.S. president tweeted.

Security was ramped up for the inauguration, with some 3,000 police patrolling the event. Bolsonaro's middle name is Messias, or Messiah in English, and many supporters believe he was chosen by God to lead Brazil, an assertion bolstered after Bolsonaro survived a stabbing during a campaign rally in September.

Bolsonaro voters hope their man will do better.


There are also concerns for Brazil's extensive and diverse environment, with Bolsonaro's pro-business push being made at the expense of preservation - especially in the Amazon, sometimes called "the lungs of the planet" and at risk from increasing deforestation.

The new president, who spent almost three decades in Congress, has also drawn worldwide criticism for his plans to roll back regulations in the Amazon and his disinterest in social programs in a country that is one of the world's most unequal in terms of income. "As a clear sign of that diplomatic shift, Bolsonaro plans to move the Brazilian embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, breaking with Brazil's traditional support for a two-state solution to the Palestinian issue".

Bolsonaro has already said he will pull his country out of a United Nations global pact on migration, and he is considering whether to keep Brazil in the Paris climate accord. Leftist president such as Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela, Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua and Miguel Diaz-Canel of Cuba - who Bolsonaro has deemed dictators - were not invited. Bolsonaro, a vocal critic of media that voice opposition to him, has promised to cut advertising funds from state-owned companies to some media organizations.


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