Iran considers Europe's offer to salvage nuclear agreement insufficient

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During a meeting in the Austrian capital of Vienna, Rouhani told Yukiya Amano, director general of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), that Iran might reconsider its cooperation level with the international nuclear watchdog.

On Friday, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif met his Russian counterpart Sergey Lavrov and discussed the the issues expected to be raised in the meeting in coming hours, reports IRNA.

The Europeans, Russia and China, urged by Tehran to make concrete proposals to guarantee the continuation of the nuclear pact and counter the return of U.S. sanctions, are meeting Iranian leaders in the Austrian capital on Friday.

During a telephone call with the French President, Emmanuel Macron, Mr Rohani stated that "Europe's proposed package to Iran for continued cooperation as part of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA - the official abbreviation of the agreement, editor's note) does not meet all of the demands of the Islamic Republic". Washington has since told countries they must stop buying the Opec producer's oil from November 4 or face financial consequences.


"Failure to maintain and implement the deal would not only affect the Iran nuclear issue itself but also cause serious negative impacts on the functioning of the non-proliferation regime as well as on the situation in the Middle East", Wang said.

Rouhani started on Monday his visits to Switzerland and Austria as Iran and the European Union are holding talks on how to save the nuclear deal despite the United States pullout.

Describing the Friday meeting as important, Iranian officials have said that key for them is to ensure measures that guarantee oil exports do not halt, and that Tehran still has access to the SWIFT worldwide bank payments messaging system.

German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas admitted that the situation is hard, and the European Union wants to make it clear to Iran that it has economic benefits from that deal, and it's looking for measures to benefit Tehran under the deal.


Iran, which strongly denies ever seeking to build a nuclear bomb, has warned it could resume uranium enrichment for civilian purposes if the deal collapses.

However, U.S. President Donald Trump decided on May 8 to quit the nuclear deal and vowed to re-impose sanctions, including oil embargo, on Tehran.

Since Trump s announcement, Iran s rial currency has fallen, prices have risen and the country has been hit by street protests and strikes.

The new round of diplomacy has been clouded after security services said they had foiled an alleged plot to bomb a Paris rally by an exiled Iranian opposition group, the People's Mujahedeen of Iran.


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